Isopropyl Alcohol – Is 70% better than 99% Strength?

What is Isopropyl Alcohol (IPA)? Isopropyl alcohol (2-propanol), also known as isopropanol or IPA, has been used for years as a universal cleaner for everything from hospitals to electronic devices. IPA can be extremely beneficial as a disinfectant when used properly, but there are some disadvantages and even dangerous consequences if it is used improperly. …

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Fluorescence Microscopy

How Does Fluorescence Microscopy Work? A fluorescence microscope works by combining the magnifying properties of the light microscope with fluorescence emitting properties of compounds. Fluorescence microscopy uses a high-intensity light source that excites a fluorescent molecule called a fluorophore in the sample observed. The samples are labeled with fluorophore where they absorb the high-intensity light …

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Immunofluorescence

What is immunofluorescence? Immunofluorescence is one of the techniques used within light microscopy, especially on microbiological samples. It uses a fluorescence microscope to observe antibodies, bonded to their antigens, with fluorescent dyes attached to specific biomolecule targets. Observers can therefore visualize the distribution of target molecules throughout a sample. The specific antigen region that an …

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Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy

What is Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) and How Does it Work? Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) uses evanescent waves to illuminate and excite selected fluorophores immediately adjacent to the glass-water interface. The electromagnetic field of the evanescent decays exponentially away from the interface, and so it can only penetrate to a 100nm depth into …

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Widefield Fluorescence Microscopy

What is Widefield Fluorescence Microscopy? In widefield fluorescence microscopy, the entire sample is illuminated with a specific wavelength of light. The fluorescent molecules are excited and emit their own light, which is observable through eyepieces or through use of a camera. Identification and visualization of cells can occur using this technique, as can 2D images …

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Fluorescence Microscopy vs. Light Microscopy

Fluorescence microscopy and light microscopy are specific imaging techniques used to observe cells or cellular components. Each of them has its situational strengths and weaknesses – areas in which the one is more effective than the other. In fact, fluorescence is really a specialized form of light microscopy that is able to produce better results …

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History of Fluorescence in Microscopy

Fredrick W. Herschel discovered fluorescence in 1845. He observed that UV light can excite quinine solution, resulting in the emission of blue light. Sir George G. Stokes built upon this observation, noting that fluorescence emissions were of longer wavelengths than the original UV light used to excite them. In the early 1900s, fluorophores were first …

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Compound Microscopes vs Stereo Microscopes

Similarities between Stereo and Compound Microscopes Magnification Similarities Both stereo microscopes and compound microscopes are used to examine very small objects or surfaces by making them appear much larger through the eyepiece. Similar Type Both types are in the group known as “optical microscopes” because they use visible light to produce the image you see …

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